Author Archive for Sarah Wengert

Hi, I'm Sarah Wengert, a creative content writer for the amazing Medical Solutions based in Omaha, Nebraska. While I'm not a Travel Nurse, I love to travel and I truly appreciate the hard, important work that nurses do. I'm very happy to represent a company that cares so much about its people. Thanks for reading!

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Clinical Corner: Team Nursing and Delegation

Team - Clinical Corner: Team Nursing and Delegation
Team Nursing can be a great, collaborative experience for patients and healthcare workers — as long as you know how to navigate the process!

By Phil Niles, Clinical Nurse Manager, Medical Solutions

Many of you have encountered the concept of team nursing during your travel and/or nursing careers. If you have not encountered it, you might one day hear something like, “Your assignment will have you taking a 1:10 assignment.” Then you might say, “What???” and they might reply, “Don’t worry — it’s team nursing!” Even more confused at this point, you might ask, “Well, what is team nursing?” What a great question! Let’s start with some definitions.

Team nursing is pairing nurses of varying skill sets and experience levels to care for a larger group of patients. This team can consist of an experienced nurse and a new nurse, a RN and an LPN, or either of these two with the addition of a nurse aide. The team is intended to create a collaborative, supportive environment that will collectively meet patient needs and promote improved communication between team members.

Team nursing is not meant to be an authoritarian hierarchy with one person ordering everyone else around. In fact, many factors go into determining how the workload is divided. Team members collaborate at the beginning of the shift to divide tasks amongst each other according to skill, scope of practice, and familiarity with each patient. A common misconception of team nursing is thinking you’d have to control every detail of care for all patients assigned to you. It’s difficult to get out of the mindset of primary nursing (one nurse to a group of patients) and give up a little control and the idea that you need to do everything yourself. For Travelers working an assignment with team nursing for the first time, it can be a challenge at first to adjust. So, let’s address a few questions you may have about team nursing as a Traveler.

What can my team members legally do in their scope of practice?

This is probably the most commonly asked question and an important topic to address. Scope of practice of LPNs and nurse aides varies by state, so it’s important to study up on the Nurse Practice Act of the state you are traveling to ahead of time. Each state’s Board of Nursing website is a good resource for this. You can also reference the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) website. Click here and you’ll find they have a drop down box where you can select your state and to generate a link to its Nurse Practice Act. You can also ask the floor manager or even the team members themselves! It is important to remember that hospitals may not allow the same scope of practice that a state lists as acceptable, so never assume anything. Even after reviewing your state’s Nurse Practice Act, make sure to ask the manager about the hospital’s specific LPN and nurse aide scope of practice.

What if something goes wrong with a patient whom an LPN or aide on my team was assigned to?

What is your accountability when delegating tasks to others? Every member of the team is accountable for their own actions. For example, an LPN may be held accountable for negligent or improper care that resulted in patient harm. However, the RN may also be held accountable for improper delegation or not intervening in the negligent care if the RN had knowledge that the care was not to standards of care.  There is a balance to be struck between delegating care and assuring that care was carried out. The RN is in a supervisory role in team nursing when the other member of the team is a LPN or aide. No one in a supervisory role should ever assume when you hand off a task that it was completed without verifying this themselves. As the RN Traveler in a team nursing scenario, you will likely see the same patients throughout the day while doing separate tasks. Take this time to also verify that all care was delivered and appropriate. 

What if the other members of my team do not communicate with me?

Team nursing relies on clear, consistent communication between all team members, so never be afraid to ask questions. Often, drops in communication happen because the other person assumes you already know the information. For example, a good way to approach this type of situation would be to say, “I’m going to see Mrs. X next. Did you already change her dressing? Do you have time to change it with me now, so we can both assess it?” This is a collaborative approach with clear communication. The other person will not be threatened or feel ordered around and will likely make a plan with you. On the other hand, an approach I do not recommend is to say, “Hey! When are you going to change Mrs. X’s dressing? You need to talk to me!” As you can tell, this may spark a bit of defensiveness and potentially damage your working relationship. Still, there are those that once in a while do not respond well to coaching, so you can always go to your charge for support if you feel your team is not working well together or have a concern about a particular team member. 

I hope this gives you guidance and arms you with information if you ever work in a team nursing environment. I also hope you see it as an opportunity to meet your patients’ needs in a new way.

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Congrats to December 2018’s Traveler of the Month and Rising Star!

Many thanks and congrats to the December 2018 Traveler of the Month, Quincy H., and also our Rising Star winner, Ivy P.! 
Traveler of the Month Quincy is an RN specializing in critical care, currently on assignment in New Orleans, Louisiana.
Three cheers each for our latest Traveler of the Month winner, Quincy H., and Rising Star winner, Ivy P.!

Many thanks and congrats to the December 2018 Traveler of the Month, Quincy H., and also our Rising Star winner, Ivy P.!

Traveler of the Month Quincy is an RN specializing in critical care, currently on assignment in New Orleans, Louisiana. He’s been in nursing for seven years and traveling for about six years. Quincy works withCareer Consultant Michelle White.

“After my first travel assignment I discovered what I love the most about Travel Nursing, which is the ability to be the boss of myself,” says Quincy. “I’m able choose not only the city and state, but the hospital I want to work at. Travel Nurses are able to choose what time of the year they want to work. You also meet so many different people and expand your knowledge of various cultures.”

Quinn, who travels with his fiancé, says his most memorable travel assignment so far was in Santa Clara, California.  

“The staff was awesome, not to mention the perfect location near the Bay Area with beautiful scenery, beach, and mountains that have seasonal snow,” he says.

Quinn says his unique ability to adapt to any situation or circumstance has been very important to his success as a Travel Nurse. He also shared these great tips for other Travelers.

“A few tips from an experienced traveler to a beginner traveler: Have flexibility, be open-minded, kind, and don’t be afraid to speak up when something doesn’t feel right,” he advises.  

Thanks so much for your hard work and great advice, Quincy!

Rising Star Ivy is an ER RNcurrently on assignment in Ottumwa, Iowa. She’s been in nursing for three years and traveling since October 2018. Ivy with Career Consultant Bill Thomson.

Ivy is known for smiling often, which makes her a great fit in the sometimes-challenging field of healthcare because she keeps the level of optimism high! Ottumwa is her first Travel Nursing job and she says the best thing about traveling is keeping things fresh.

“[I enjoy] meeting new people, new environments and new challenges,” says Ivy.

Ivy offered the following advice to new and aspiring Travelers: “Be open-minded and unafraid to ask questions and express concerns.”

Thank you for all of your hard work and dedication to quality patient care, Ivy!

Congratulations again to the Medical Solutions December 2018 Traveler of the Month and Rising Star! Quincy and Ivy, we are so thankful to each of you for your dedication to patient care and Travel Nursing!

Could you be the next Medical Solutions Traveler of the Month or Rising Star? Travelers who receive a perfect hospital evaluation are eligible to win these monthly awards — with Rising Star going to newer Medical Solutions Travelers. Click here to learn more and to see if you could be the next winner of a $100 Visa or Amazon gift card as recognition for a job well done!

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State Spotlight: Hawaii

Hawaii Kayak - State Spotlight: Hawaii
Say “Aloha” to Travel Nursing in Hawaii!

This month’s State Spotlight takes us to humble Hawaii! The Aloha State is known for its otherworldly landscape and flora, gorgeous beaches, unique native culture, delicious food, and so much more. There’s a reason why Hawaii is a jackpot destination for so many Travelers — and that reason is simply that Hawaii is all-around incredible. Read on to learn more about why Travel Nursing in Hawaii will have you at “Aloha” and give you plenty to write home about!

Travel Nursing in Hawaii

Hawaii Stamp - State Spotlight: Hawaii

Hawaii is a fabulous state for Travel Nursing — in fact, it’s a bucket list state for most Travelers! The Aloha State offers so much to experience on your days off and you’ll enjoy access to lots of amazing career opportunities at incredible facilities.

Hawaii is home to about 38 hospitals — three of which meet high enough standards to be ranked among U.S. News & World Report’s 2018/2019 Best Hospitals list. That includes their #1-ranked Hawaii hospital, Queen’s Medical Center in Honolulu, which is nationally ranked in one specialty, in addition to being ranked “High Performing” in five adult specialties and six procedures/conditions. Rounding out the top three overall best hospitals in Hawaii are: Honolulu’s Straub Medical Center and Kaiser Permanente Moanalua Medical Center, also in Honolulu.   

U.S. News & World Report’s 2018 “Best States” ranked Hawaii #17 overall, as well as #1 for healthcare, #16 for crime & corrections, and #18 for opportunity. Livability.com ranked Honolulu, Hilo, and Kahului among the best places to live in Hawaii.

As for licensing, Hawaii is not currently a walk-through, compact, or NURSYS state. Click here for more, up to date info on licensing in Hawaii.

Hawaii Fast Facts

Surfboards - State Spotlight: Hawaii
A bunch of surfboards beckon on a sunny day in Maui.


State Nickname: The Aloha State

Capital: Honolulu

Largest City: Honolulu

National Parks: 8

State Parks: 50

National Historic and Natural Landmarks: 40

State Motto: “Ua Mau ke Ea o ka ‘Āina i ka Pono” meaning “The life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness”  

State Flower: Pua Aloalo

State Tree: Kukui

State Mammal: Hawaiian Monk Seal

State Dance: Hula

State Musical Instrument: Ukulele

State Gem: Black coral

Hawaii was the 50th state.

Hawaii is comprised of these eight main islands: Nihau, Kauai, Oahu, Maui, Molokaim Lanai, Kahoolawe, and the Big Island (officially called Hawai’i).

The Hawaiian alphabet has just 13 letters and every word and syllable ends in a vowel.

Hawaii is the only state that commercially grows coffee, cacao, and vanilla beans.

Hawaii has the highest life expectancy age in the nation.

Unrelated to the above fact, Hawaiians consume the most Spam per capita in the U.S. It is even served at their McDonald’s and Burger Kings!

Surfing, surfboards, hooked cane knives, beach cleaning machines, Ocean vodka, radioactive particle cleaning gel, pineapple coring machines, and Kona coffee, were all invented in or originated in Oregon!

Hawaii was the first state to ban billboards.

Hawaii has a great variety of sand! They have black, white, yellow, red, and green beaches.  

The largest and most active volcano in the world is the Kilauea volcano, which has been raging for 600,000-some years.

Because of the continuous eruption from the Kilauea volcano, The Big Island grows by about 42 acres annually.

Because of its resemblance to the surface of the moon, astronauts in the 1960s trained for moon travel by walking on Mauna Loa’s hardened lava fields.

Named for the Earl of Sandwich, Hawaii was once called the Sandwich Isles.

Hawaii has no statewide police force or department of motor vehicles. These are managed by each county government. 

The north shore of Molokai features the world’s largest sea cliffs, clocking in at 3,000-plus feet high. 

Famous folks from or who’ve lived in Hawaii include Barack Obama, Jason Momoa, Nicole Kidman, Bruno Mars, Lauren Graham, Tia Carrere, Jack Johnson, Bethany Hamilton, Lois Lowry, Marcus Mariota, Don Ho, Michelle Wie, and Bette Midler.     

One of the wettest spots on Earth is Waialeale Mountain which averages 488-some inches of rain each year.

Only two mammals are thought to be native to Hawaii: the hoary bat and the monk seal.

While Hawaii is the widest state in the nation, if you consider landmass it would take 40 Hawaiis to make up one Texas. 

Hawaii has its own time zone and does not practice daylight savings time.

The Big Island leads the world in harvesting orchids and macadamia nuts.

There are a lot of rules around leis, including the fact that it’s considered rude to refuse a lei or take it off in front of the person who gave it to you. Leis should also never be thrown away, but should be returned to the land.

Hawaii was the first state to ban plastic bags in 2015.

To Do & See in Hawaii

Kalalau Valley - State Spotlight: Hawaii
The green ridges of Kalalau Valley against the deep blue ocean on the Hawaiian Island of Kauai.

Hawaii is one of the nation’s most unique and breathtaking places, making it a very special destination for Travel Nurses. Beyond its world-famous beaches, Hawaii is well known for lush fauna, intriguing volcanoes, incredible seafood and other cuisine (yes, including the state’s quirky love of Spam), rich native culture, and so much more.

The Aloha State’s capital of Honolulu is by far its largest population center. In fact, Honolulu County is home to about 70 percent of the state’s entire population. Other cities of interest include Mililani, Pearl City, Waipahu, Kaneohe, and several other smaller communities. In Honolulu you’ll want to check out Diamond Head, Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve, Pearl Harbor and the USS Arizona Memorial Park, Iolani Palace, Waikiki Beach and neighborhood, Chinatown, the Koko Crater Trail, Manoa Falls, and so much more.

Other must-dos in Hawaii include Volcanoes National Park, Haleakala, Na Pali Coast State Wilderness Park, Hana Highway, Kilauea, Waimea Canyon State Park, Polynesian Cultural Center, Molokini, Waipio Valley, Mauna Loa Observatory, and Bishop Museum.

You can also try surfing here in the state where it was invented, attend a luau, take a helicopter tour, kayak, take a sunset cruise, snorkel, hike, bike, and so much more!

The food in Hawaii is as unique as it is delicious. As an island state, seafood is obviously a very big deal here and the state is known for that in general as well as iconic faves like loco moco, malasadas, spam musubi (spam sushi), shaved ice, Kalua pork, acai bowls, manapua, ice cream mochi, poke, haupia pie, pineapple, macadamia nuts, hula pie, ramen, huli huli chicken, lau lau, poi, and garlic shrimp. Wash it all down with a Mai Tai or a piping-hot cup of Kona coffee and you’ll be living like a true Hawaiian!

Ready for your adventure to humble Hawaii?! Search jobs now to find your dream Travel Nurse job in Hawaii! Or, search all jobs here.

Kona Coffee - State Spotlight: Hawaii
100% Pure Kona Coffee.
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Congrats to November 2018’s Traveler of the Month and Rising Star!

Laurel Maestri TotM NOV 2018 - Congrats to November 2018’s Traveler of the Month and Rising Star!
Congrats to November 2018 Traveler of the Month, Laurel M. (pictured), and Rising Star winner, Chelsea G.!

Many thanks and congrats to the November 2018 Traveler of the Month, Laurel M., and also our Rising Star winner, Chelsea G.!

Traveler of the Month Laurel is an L&D RN, currently on assignment in Monterey, California. She’s been in nursing for 11 years and traveling for seven years. Laurel works withCareer Consultant Ashley Klein.

There’s tough competition for this experienced healthcare Traveler’s favorite assignment location!

“It’s a tie between Seattle, Washington, and Jackson, Wyoming — because I love the mountains,” says Laurel, who says she loves the flexibility Travel Nursing adds to her life.

But Laurel’s not done racking up favorite destinations just yet.

“I love to travel internationally and will be summiting Mount Kilimanjaro for my birthday this year,” she says.

We asked Laurel to share some tips for future and aspiring Travelers and she offered the following fabulous advice: “As a Travel Nurse, you need to stay open-minded and have a list of questions to ask during an interview.”

Thanks so much for your great work and helpful advice, Laurel!

Rising Star Chelsea is a BSN, RN specializing in NICU. She’scurrently on assignment in Danville, Pennsylvania and works with Career Consultant Mike McSorley.

Mike praises Chelsea for her incredible work and says she has a “wonderful personality” and is “very kind and polite.”

“Chelsea is hardworking and very knowledgeable,” says Mike, adding that these and other qualities make her a great success at Travel Nursing.

“She’s flexible and committed to top-notch patient care, day in and day out,” says Mike.

Thank you for all of your hard work and dedication to quality patient care, Chelsea!

Congratulations again to the Medical Solutions November 2018 Traveler of the Month and Rising Star! Laurel and Chelsea, we are so grateful to each of you for your dedication to patient care and Travel Nursing!

Could you be the next Medical Solutions Traveler of the Month or Rising Star? Travelers who receive a perfect hospital evaluation are eligible to win these monthly awards — with Rising Star going to newer Medical Solutions Travelers. Click here to learn more and to see if you could be the next winner of a $100 Visa or Amazon gift card as recognition for a job well done!

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Clinical Corner: Assignment Safety

Safety First - Clinical Corner: Assignment Safety
Keeping yourself, your patients, and your license safe while Travel Nursing is essential to your success!

By Phil Niles, Clinical Nurse Manager, Medical Solutions

The ratios are too high, the hospital is too busy, and there isn’t any help! What do I do?!

As a Traveler, you may have felt these sentiments or even voiced them. Feeling unsafe on assignment is a scary experience — and that can be especially true in a new hospital where you really don’t know anyone. Who do you turn to for support in that situation? Because every scenario is different, there are no black and white answers, but let’s look at some assignment safety concerns commonly reported by nurses and how you can best address them.

Ratios

Many nurses report being “out of ratio” or facing high ratios. What exactly is high?  Well, it really comes down to what the nurse’s experience is and what their expectations are of a hospital. California is the only state with nurse:patient ratio laws. Med-surg, for instance is a 1:5 ratio there, but this ratio could be much different elsewhere in the country. Some states see up to 1:7-8 ratios and more!

So, what is “unsafe”? Well, one common average is 1:6 on a med-surg floor. If a Traveler comes from California and starts an assignment on the east coast, they could suddenly see 1:7 ratios when they are used to seeing 1:5. This is a drastic difference.  The nurse could suddenly feel overwhelmed and unable to meet the needs of the patients. Their expectation of the position may have been unrealistic as well. 

Perpetually Short-staffed Units

Another common complaint is that a unit consistently does not have enough staff to care for the patients on the floor, causing higher ratios as well. Most Travel Nurse positions exist because a hospital recognizes that there’s a critical shortage of nurses on their floors. So, travel assignments will often be short-staffed due to the nature of the work. However, this makes a big difference whether or not a hospital is actively seeking new permanent employees and/or Travelers to fill its gaps.

It’s important to do your research before accepting a position. Ask why they have a travel need when interviewing. This is a great way to get more information about this area. Even gauging how the interviewer answers the question will give you insight.

Being Asked to Take Patients Outside Your Skill Set and Comfort Level

This is a very serious situation. Travelers asked to take patients outside their skill set often feel like they have to — to keep their job and stay in good standing with their travel company. But hear this: No nurse should be forced into taking an assignment outside of their ability! Travelers must be vocal when this issue arises and calmly state the reasons they cannot accept a patient assignment. The worst thing you can do is blindly accept this kind of assignment and hope to “fake it, ’til you make it.” Be professional but be firm. Always know that anything that happens with the patient under your care will be your responsibility and under your license. Continue to take the issue up the chain of command if the hospital is adamant. Also, contact your recruiter! Many travel companies — including Medical Solutions — have in-house clinical staff that can be your advocate in the field. Find out if you have this resource before you accept an assignment with a company.

Being Asked to Cut Corners Because “That’s How it’s Done Here”

There are no circumstances where it’s acceptable to do anything outside of the standards of practice set forth by Joint Commission standards and state laws. A commonly reported situation is perm staff telling a Traveler that a physician does not like to be called at night. So, they just order labs and the physician signs it the next day. This is never acceptable, unless there is a protocol order signed by the physician in the chart already. Always call the physician. Will they be upset? Probably. But this is better than ordering something without an official physician’s order and having a complaint sent to the BON on you practicing out of scope. The core staff will do what they do, but don’t assume that risk yourself just because everyone else is doing it!

There are several other issues that Travelers tend to report as unsafe, and many of them are valid. Overall, what can you do to protect yourself?

Ask more questions. If the manager says their ratio is 1:5, but sometimes can be 6-7, then ask how often someone on the floor carries more than six patients. If the manager says Travelers float, then ask if they float round-robin with the staff or if they float first. Ask if floating mid-shift or more than once per shift is common. Ask where they expect Travelers to float. It is never out of line to ask questions during an interview. 

Also, take a personal inventory and know your expectations of each assignment. If your expectations don’t align with what the hospital expects, then it may not be a good fit. Trust your instincts! 

Lastly, talk to your travel company and have them work for you! Get enough information about an assignment from your recruiter before an interview so you can make an informed decision and be prepared to discuss any questions you have.

Traveling is an amazing experience, and you can make sure that it is just that and no less for you. Get answers to your questions, clarify your expectations, and find that perfect match!

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Experienced Nurses Needed for SeriousFun Camps!

Looking for something incredible to do with your nursing skills this summer? You’re in luck, because Medical Solutions is expanding our partnership with Roundup River Ranch to include two more incredible SeriousFun camps!

RRR logo[1]

In 2019, we are partnering with SeriousFun to help staff nurses for:

  • Roundup River Ranch, located in gorgeous Gypsum, Colorado, just 45 minutes west of Vail. 
  • Camp Boggy Creek, located in sunny Eustis, Florida, just 45 minutes north of Orlando. 
  • The Painted Turtle, located in beautiful Lake Hughes, California, just 45 minutes north of Los Angeles.

Each camp seeks three RNs for a paid assignment, including free food and housing, running from early May through the end of August. Ideal candidates for these positions are ER nurses with pediatric experience, PICU experience, or at least one year of recent pediatric experience.

rsz the painted turtle - Experienced Nurses Needed for SeriousFun Camps!

SeriousFun offers camps for children with serious illnesses that allow them a retreat from being a patient and an important chance to be a kid, have fun, enjoy new experiences, make friends, and benefit from the immeasurable healing power of happiness. Even better, SeriousFun provides this amazing experience free of charge — and they depend on excellent staff and volunteers to make that possible.

rsz camp boggy creek - Experienced Nurses Needed for SeriousFun Camps!

Click here to check out camp diaries from previous Medical Solutions Travelers who’ve gone back to camp. They’ve each had a life-changing experience!

If you’re an ER nurse with pediatric experience or a nurse with PICU experience or at least one year of recent pediatric experience who wants to be a part of this amazing effort — while also treating yourself to a sweet summer location and rewarding camp experience — please contact Kelly at kelly.grubb@medicalsolutions.com or 402.986.5124.

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7 Wonderful Winter Locations for Travel Nurse Jobs

Winter Fun Woman
Where do you want to land a Travel Nursing job this winter?

With winter’s chill settled in and a new year on the horizon, now is the perfect time to explore options for your next adventure in Travel Nursing. Whether you want to embrace the colder months in all their frosty glory or you prefer to hightail it somewhere warm until spring comes, there are lots of great locations for you to choose from. As your brainstorm your next move, we suggest these 7 wonderful winter locations for Travel Nurse jobs.

Hawaii

Hawaii

Spending time in The Aloha State is but a pipe dream to many — however, for Travelers, it’s not so hard to make it a dream come true! With balmy year-round temps and hundreds of miles of coastline, Hawaii is the perfect place for a winter assignment that lets you totally ignore the existence of snow and completely reject hats and gloves in favor of swimsuits and sandals. In otherworldly Hawaii, you can explore golden sands, clear waters, exciting volcanoes, rugged landscapes, gorgeous tropical foliage, island traditions, delicious seafood, and so much more.   

Click here to explore jobs in heavenly Hawaii!

Virginia

Virginia is for Lovers, state motto and welcome sign

Virginia is for lovers — and its winters are beloved by Travelers! Check into a cozy cabin, hit the slopes, or visit one of the state’s 230+ wineries to get that warm, fuzzy feeling. For some winter wildlife, check out the adorable harbor seals at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Explore Virginia’s rich history at First Landing State Park (where the Jamestown colonists landed in 1607) and historic Jamestown, Mount Vernon, Wilderness Road State Park, and Colonial Williamsburg. Warm up and chill out at the famous Jefferson Pools — naturally occurring hot springs famous for the fact that Thomas Jefferson visited in 1818 and loved them so much he didn’t leave for three weeks straight! Click here to learn more about The Old Dominion State in our Virginia State Spotlight.

Click here to find your dream Travel Nurse job in Virginia.

Texas

Texas Woman Paddleboard 1 - 7 Wonderful Winter Locations for Travel Nurse Jobs
A beautiful young adult woman enjoys a peaceful moment on the water with her paddle board and faithful pet dog. The sun illuminates the scene, casting a golden glow. Shot in Austin, Texas, USA.

They say “Don’t mess with Texas,” but many Travel Nurses have absolutely loved their dalliances with The Lone Star State! From its large selection of Travel Nursing job opportunities to its ample choices for activities on your days off, Texas is a great place to land for a travel job. The temps in winter stay pretty warm here, so if winter’s not your thing, Texas just might be! Don’t forget The Alamo — not to mention wonderfully weird Austin, the San Antonio boardwalk, Houston Space Center, Padre Island, and hoppin’ urban spots like Houston and Dallas. Shopping, pro sports, museums, history, and dining are all on point in this great state as well!   

Click here to mess with Texas and find your perfect Travel Nurse job there.

California

Couple with dog skating outdoors

When it comes to Travel Nursing jobs, Cali is the year-round king. The Golden State always has lots of great Travel Nurse opportunities due to its ahead-of-the-curve staffing laws. Plus, it’s a gorgeous, diverse place that many Travelers quite enjoy calling their home for 13 weeks at a time. California has a very wide range of options in everything from landscape to activities. From skiing, surfing, hiking, and climbing to shopping, spas, sightseeing, and wine tastings, this state is a true crowd-pleaser. Learn more about this fabulous state in our California State Spotlight.   

Click here to check out California Travel Nursing jobs.

Arizona

Horseshoe Bend (Arizona)

The Grand Canyon State is a super popular destination for wintertime Travel Nursing due to its abundant natural beauty and mild winters. It also helps that a shifting population of sunbirds, among other things, means a high inventory of awesome job opportunities. One of the nation’s most marvelous sights, The Grand Canyon, is a huge draw year-round, and there’s plenty more to see and do in this southwestern state. Explore Horseshoe Bend, Red Rock Scenic Canyon, and Desert Botanical Garden. Plus, even though it does remain mild in winter, Arizona offers skiers plenty to do in the snowy peaks of Flagstaff’s Snowbowl. Click here to learn more about The Grand Canyon State in our Arizona State Spotlight.    

Click here to explore Travel Nursing jobs in Arizona.

New York

Central Park ice rink

The colder months are a great time to take a bite out of the Big Apple. Exploring incredible art museums, taking in a Broadway show, and warming up with world-class cuisine, are just a few reasons why New York is a fabulous place to embrace the winter season. If you want to get outdoors, lace up for an adventure at one of the city’s seasonal ice-skating rinks, including those hosted in Bryant Park, Van Cortland Park, and Central Park — all of which are also great choices for grabbing a thermos full of warm drink and going on a winter wonderland walk. Want to escape the concrete jungle? Head to the Catskills for a ski getaway! Click here to learn more about The Empire State in our New York State Spotlight.

Click here to check out New York Travel Nursing jobs.

Colorado

Colorado Ski

If you love winter and want to indulge in all of its snowy glory, Colorado is a fabulous choice for a winter location. The state is well-known for some of the nation’s best skiing in spots like Vail, Aspen, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Telluride, and Steamboat Springs. You can also hit the slopes on a snowboard or tube, or — my personal favorite — stay in the lodge and sip spiked cocoa all day! Winter carnivals are a good way to heat things up, from Steamboat Springs’ 104-year-old Winter Carnival to Breckenridge’s Ullr Fest. Denver, Colorado Springs, Boulder, and other city centers offer great art, exciting culture, delicious food, and more urban delights year-round. Click here to learn more about The Centennial State in our Colorado State Spotlight.

Click here to explore Colorado Travel Nursing jobs.

Did we miss your dream winter location? Click here to search Travel Nursing jobs by job title, specialty, and/or state!

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State Spotlight: Oregon

Oregon Columbia River Gorge
Outstanding Oregon is a gorgeous place for your next Travel Nurse adventure!

This month’s State Spotlight takes us to outstanding Oregon! The Beaver State is known for its breathtaking landscapes, unique creative culture, world-class wineries, and so much more. There’s also an abundance of lucrative, resume-building Travel Nurse jobs in this majestic state. Read on to learn more about why Travel Nursing in Oregon is A-OK in a magical way!

Travel Nursing in Oregon

Oregon Stamp

Oregon is a fantastic place for Travelers to take an assignment. In The Beaver State you will never be bored on your days off and you’ll enjoy access to lots of amazing career opportunities at top-notch Traveler-friendly hospitals.

Oregon is home to about 65 hospitals — 10 of which meet high enough standards to be ranked among U.S. News & World Report’s 2018/2019 Best Hospitals list. That includes their #1-ranked Oregon hospital, OHSU Hospital in Portland, which is nationally ranked in six specialties and seven children’s specialties, in addition to being ranked “High Performing” in five adult specialties and eight procedures/conditions. Rounding out the top five overall best hospitals in Oregon are: Portland’s Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland’s Providence Portland Medical Center, Salem’s Salem Hospital, and Kaiser Permanente Sunnyside Medical Center in Clackamas.   

U.S. News & World Report’s 2018 “Best States” ranked Oregon #16 overall, as well as #6 for economy and #3 for infrastructure. The publication also named Portland, Oregon #6 on its 2018 list of “Best Places to Live.”

As for licensing, Oregon is not currently a walk-through state or a compact state, but it is a NURSYS state. Click here for more, up to date info on licensing in Oregon.

Oregon Fast Facts

State Nickname: The Beaver State

Capital: Salem

Largest City: Portland

Oregon Lighthouse

National Parks: 5

State Parks: 255

National Historic and Natural Landmarks: 28

State Motto: “She flies with her own wings” 

State Flower: Oregon Grape

State Tree: Douglas Fir

State Fish: Chinook Salmon

State Animal: American Beaver

State Rock: Thunder-egg (geode)

State Gem: Oregon sunstone

Oregon was the 33rd state.

Oregon’s is the only U.S. state flag with different designs on each side.

Portland, Oregon has more breweries within its city limits than any other city in the world.    

Oregon’s Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the nation. It formed more than 6,500 years ago inside the remains of an ancient volcano!

Eugene, Oregon was the first city to have one-way streets.

Marionberries, the Nike swoosh, Pendleton blankets, the first Wiki site, American-style Maraschino cherries, the computer mouse, hacky sacks, erector sets, spikeless track shoes, the Leatherman, Rogue Ales (and SO many other beers), Tillamook Cheese, and the Coolest cooler (a tricked out cooler with a blender, stereo, USB charging port, and more!) were all invented in or originated in Oregon!

Cannon Beach, Oregon

Oregon is home to the most ghost towns in the United States.

Oregon’s Tillamook Cheese Factory is the largest cheese factory in the world, yielding delicious results for cheese-lovers.

The D River in Lincoln City, Oregon is one of the world’s shortest rivers at a mere 121 feet.

On the other hand, The Beaver State’s Hells Canyon clocks in as the deepest river gorge in North America at a whopping 8,000 feet deep.

Oregon is the only state with an official state nut. The nut in question? The humble hazelnut!

Nike, originally called Blue Ribbon Sports, was started in Oregon. PSU student Carolyn Davidson designed Nike’s iconic swoosh in 1971 and sold it to the company for just $35!

Until January 2018, Oregon was one of only two U.S. states without self-serve gas stations. While Oregon now allows patrons to pump their own gas only at stand-alone stations in counties with less 40,000 residents, New Jersey is still holding out!

Calling all winos! Oregon is home to more than 750 vineyards.  

Way back in 1973, Oregon became the first state to decriminalize marijuana. It followed up in 2014 by becoming one of the first states to legalize recreational marijuana.  

Famous folks from or who’ve lived in Louisiana include Tonya Harding, Ty Burrell, Lisa Rinna, Kathleen Hanna, Howard Hesseman, Isaiah Mustafa, River Phoenix, Holly Madison, Steve Prefontaine, Beverly Clearly, Clark Gable, Matthew Fox, Ginger Rogers, Kim Novak, Courtney Love, Ken Kesey, Jon Heder, Phil Knight, Raymond Carver, Tommy Thayer, Dorothy McCullough, and Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh.     

When naming the city of Portland, the odds were 50-50 and decided by a coin toss. If the coin had landed the other way Portland would be called Boston!

The biggest mushroom on Earth — a honey fungus spanning more than two miles — resides in Oregon’s Blue Mountains. It’s believed to be thousands of years old.

If you didn’t know, the dream of the ’90s is alive in Portland! In addition to the popular TV show “Portlandia,” The Goonies and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest were set and filmed in Oregon.  

The world’s tallest barber pole stands 72-feet high and resides in Forest Grove, Oregon.

Oregon has nine beautiful lighthouses along its coastline.

Mount Hood, a dormant volcano, is Oregon’s highest peak at 11,239 feet tall.

Oregon’s largest state park, Silver Falls State Park, boasts 10 waterfalls.

To Do & See in Oregon

Iconic Portland, Oregon Old Town sign with an outline of Oregon and a stag

From breathtaking natural sights to quirky urban areas, The Beaver State is a magical playground for Travel Nurses! The state offers a diverse landscape of mountains, forest, and beaches, as well as world-class wine, craft beer, incredible dining, and stimulating culture — making Oregon a wonderful place to embark on your next Travel Nurse journey! 

For city lovers, The Beaver State’s largest cities include Portland, Salem, Eugene, Gresham, Beaverton, and Bend. As you have heard via TV’s “Portlandia,” the dream of the ’90s is alive in Portland — but that’s not all that make it a great place to take an assignment or a day trip. Where else can you visit Forest Park — the largest park in city limits in the U.S. and the world’s smallest park, Mill’s End Park, which is a wee spot on a median?! You will also definitely want to check out Powell’s Books, Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden, the Portland Mercado, Portland Art Museum, Portland Japanese Gardens, Multnomah Falls, Voodoo Doughnut, Washington Park, Pittock Mansion, Portland Saturday Market, Hoyt Arboretum, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, gigantic Paul Bunyan, and so many more incredible spots. Craft beer lovers and wine aficionados will feel pampered with the many offerings here as well!     

Oregon Crater Lake

Outside of the big city, adventurers will want to check out Cannon Beach — which many will recognize from The Goonies, The Oregon Vortex and House of Mystery in Gold Hill, The Enchanted Forest near Salem, the Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm, Astoria, the Willamette Valley, and so many more.

For those who love the great outdoors, get ready to fall hard for Oregon. The Beaver State is known for its almost otherworldly natural beauty. To experience this, check out places like Crater Lake National Park, Cascades Lake Scenic Byway, Mount Hood, Hells Canyon Recreational Area, Yachats, Wallowa Lake, Columbia River Gorge, Greenwood Poplar Tree Farm, Thor’s Well, The Painted Hills and the John Day Fossil Beds, Natural Bridges, Deschutes River, and Dee Wright Observatory, to name a few.

If you like to eat you will LOVE Oregon!The farm-to-table restaurant scene is a big deal here, resulting in incredible dining options, and the state is also known for its fresh seafood and unique regional favorites. While on assignment in Oregon enjoy iconic faves like marionberry pie, Dungeness crab, Moonstruck Chocolates, hazelnuts, Tillamook Cheese, Vietnamese chicken wings, Salt & Straw Ice Cream, Voodoo Doughnuts, tater tots, Tofurky, steamer clams, salmon, wild mushrooms, fish & chips, and oysters. Wash it all down with a piping-hot Stumptown Coffee, and ice-cold Rouge Ale, or a fine Oregon Pinot and you’ll be living like a true Oregonian!

Ready for your adventure to outstanding Oregon?!

Search jobs now to find your dream Travel Nurse job in Oregon!
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Clinical Corner: Viva La Resolution!

A cup of coffee and notepad on white wooden table.

By Phil Niles, Clinical Nurse Manager, Medical Solutions

It’s nearly a new year and many of us will soon be seeking paths that lead to self-improvement through resolutions. Lose all the weight! Write a book! Learn to play the guitar and become a STAR!

A new year brings hope for positive change and the drive to get started. I feel this hope and drive at the end of each year, yet almost every new year I abandon my goal in the first month and don’t follow through — and I’m not alone. Statistically, one in two people will make a New Year’s resolution at the start of 2019, but only one in 10 will succeed at upholding their resolution for at least a year. 

My past resolutions have included learning to play the guitar, speaking fluent Spanish, getting out of debt, and, of course, the ol’ tried and true lose weight and get fit.  Unfortunately, I am not a world-famous guitarist (but I now own two cool guitars), I speak only broken, butchered Spanish — finding myself asking for a goat with fancy socks when I wanted a burger with fries, and I also continue to have a fan club of creditors that check in on me monthly.

However, in 2018 I did make a resolution to get to the gym on the regular. At the time, I was fairly active but only sporadically and it involved mountain biking chased by a couple beers afterwards. My initial goal in 2018 was to leave work at lunch, go to the gym, and walk on the treadmill every day. To my great surprise, I kept it up! I even started mixing in running intervals with the Couch To 10K app, and soon I was running more than walking.

Then I started talking to a trainer at the gym.  He asked me what my goals were, and I realistically replied, “To build enough strength to carry in groceries for my wife without groaning. She would be so impressed with my incredible ability!” We high-fived and came up with a plan to achieve this. At first, I thought he was trying to find ways to keep my body in a continual state of pain and suffering, but I stuck with it and slowly saw improvement and positive change. That was eight months ago. 

Now, I’m not the perfect example of how to create positive change, but as we’re all creating our 2019 resolutions, I want to share some tips with you on how I stuck with my resolution and met my goals — because I know you can do it too! 

Don’t try to climb the tallest mountain on day one. 

The most important advice I can give is to start with a goal that’s modest and attainable. Start by forming a habit that you can easily repeat week to week. I started by going to the gym and walking the treadmill at lunch four times a week. Some weeks I went all five workdays, some I only made it twice, and I was OK with that. The main thing was that I was going! It’s said that you need to continue a new activity for at least two weeks solid to make it a habit. I laid this groundwork and then when I felt ready built on that habit and set new goals. 

Turn frustration into motivation.

Everything did not go perfectly. I had setbacks, like pulled muscles, illness, and the unpredictability of life. But I made a point not to get discouraged or frustrated. I picked up where I left off and even took a step back to be sure I didn’t overdo anything. I also did not weigh myself often or diligently document weight training progress. I would hop on the scale every month or so, but I didn’t use this as the only measure of success or failure. Remember, this is about positive change, not just losing weight or getting stronger — it is about feeling better! Milestones are important to monitor, but they do not define your success. 

Be flexible. 

So, let’s say you didn’t get through your workout this week … END OF THE WORLD! WHY AM I EVEN TRYING? LIGHT ALL THE THINGS ON FIRE! Life is not always going to cooperate with your plans. Accept that this will happen and roll with the punches.  Incorporate whatever is blocking you into a challenge and make new goals. Always remember that YOU are in charge of what happens to you, not a hard workout, not discouraging remarks from others. Value yourself and be proud of what you have done to improve your life. To channel the wise, wonderful Yoda, “Do or do not, there is no try.”

Make that change and have a great 2019!

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Congrats to October 2018’s Traveler of the Month and Rising Star!

Laura M TotM 2

Congrats to October Traveler of the Month, Laura M.!

Many thanks and congrats to the October 2018 Traveler of the Month, Laura M., and also our Rising Star winner, Elizabeth L.!

Traveler of the Month Laura is an RN, BSN specializing in neonatal ICU, currently on assignment in Boston, Massachusetts. She’s been in nursing for nearly seven years and works with Career Consultant Wade Tatem. Laura has also previously worked in med surg and labor & delivery. She traveled with Medical Solutions a few years back as an L&D nurse, went perm for a bit, switched to NICU, and returned to Travel Nursing in August 2018.

Laura M TotM

Laura travels with her cutie-pie pup, Hank.

Laura travels with her adorable one-year-old pup, Hank.

“It’s always nice to come home to him,” says Laura. “He makes sure that we get outside wherever we are and find new places to walk and hike.”

In addition to traveling, Laura loves to sew and knit.

“I don’t sew so much when I travel — too much stuff to drag around — but now that it’s winter, I can’t wait to knit some warm hats for Christmas and for the little babies at work!”

Laura loves Travel Nursing because of the potential to see so many different places while not having to “worry about the job part!”

“Traveling, even for this short time, has helped me develop so much as a person and a nurse. Being forced out of your comfort zone is how people grow,” she says. “I was just in Delaware and really enjoyed it. I was near Philly and Baltimore to go sight-see and not far from the beach, which I love. I made some really good friends there as well.”

Laura shared a few great tips for new and aspiring Travelers:

  1. “Be flexible! It’s actually something I have to remind myself of a lot — whether it’s with housing, learning the unit, or just figuring out your new routine in a new city.”
  2. “Leave lots of time to get where you need to go and do a test drive to the hospital. Figure out parking, coffee on the way, etc., before your first day.”
  3. “Don’t be afraid to ask questions. You don’t want to make a mistake because you made an assumption. Every place does things a little different.”

Thanks so much for your great work ethic and awesome advice, Laura!

ElizabethL2

Congrats to October Rising Star, Elizabeth!

Rising Star Elizabeth is a cardiac progressive care RN who’s been in nursing for three years and traveling since March 2018. She’s currently on assignment in Cookeville, Tennessee and works with Career Consultant Megan Gerwick.

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Elizabeth travel with her husband and two-year-old daughter.

Nursing is Elizabeth’s second career. She has a degree in Athletic Training and worked in that field for about five years before going back to school for her BSN. She travels with her husband and two-year-old daughter.

“I wouldn’t be able to do this if they didn’t come with me — I don’t know how most Travelers are able to be away from family like they are,” says Elizabeth. “My husband is a stay-at-home dad, so he watches our daughter on the days I work and then we get to go explore and have adventures all together on my days off!”

Of the two locations she’s worked thus far, Elizabeth says both have been wonderful.

“My first assignment I ended up staying on there for seven months and really got to feel like I was a part of the team and was treated like one of the ‘regular’ employees,” she says. “It was a wonderful experience. I got to learn a lot and make so many new friends!”

Elizabeth’s favorite part about Travel Nursing is the experiences she has along the way.

“I have the opportunity to travel and see so many places that most people don’t,” she says. “Not only can I visit new places, but I get to step inside different hospitals and see how they work. I get to see the good and the bad, learn new ways of doing things, learn different steps and processes that can make things run more smoothly — or not, and learn so much from other nurses I meet!” 

She shared some wonderful Traveler tips:

  1. “Don’t get too hung up on what ‘you’ve always done.’ Every place is different, and I’ve seen Travelers come in and say they don’t like things or things aren’t done right there. Constructive criticism isn’t a bad thing, but we kind of have to consider ourselves guests inside someone else’s home.”
  2. “If you offer help when you can and do what you can to make your floor run smoothly, other nurses will help you. If you want to be island, they’ll let you be an island.”

Thank you for sharing your story and this great Travel Nursing advice, Elizabeth!

Congratulations again to the Medical Solutions October 2018 Traveler of the Month and Rising Star! Laura and Elizabeth, we are so grateful to each of you for your dedication to patient care and Travel Nursing!

Could you be the next Medical Solutions Traveler of the Month or Rising Star? Travelers who receive a perfect hospital evaluation are eligible to win these monthly awards — with Rising Star going to newer Medical Solutions Travelers. Click here to learn more and to see if you could be the next winner of a $100 Visa or Amazon gift card as recognition for a job well done!